An RCC library patron works with the Mango Languages online learning program.

Languages are free online through RCC library

For the entire month of October, the Rappahannock Community College / Richmond County Public Library has signed up for a free trial of the Mango Languages online language lessons. Those wishing to find out more about these lessons need no login or password. Nothing but Internet access is required in order to start learning any of 63 languages—from Arabic to Yiddish — from a library, school, or home computer, or even “on the go” with apps for iPhone, Android, Kindle and Nook.

An RCC library patron works with the Mango Languages online learning program.

An RCC library patron works with the Mango Languages online learning program.

Users can choose between a traditional lesson format, and learning through foreign films with Mango Premiere. A number of specialty mini-courses are also available, including medical Spanish, Spanish for librarians, Romance languages, scholarly and religious languages, “endangered” languages, Portuguese for soccer fans, “pirate talk,” and others. Also, in addition to foreign languages, Mango offers 17 English courses that are taught completely in the student’s native language.

Clicking on this link will take inquirers directly to the list of language lessons. RCC’s librarian, Dan Ream, requests, “Please give Mango Languages a try and let me know if our library should purchase this for continuing access; and, if so, which of the 63 languages you’d value the most.” He adds that he hopes users will tell others who they think might enjoy this “fun language-learning program” of this chance to test-drive it. For more information, or to leave feedback on the Mango experience, please e-mail Ream at dream@rappahannock.edu.

Again, there are no special requirements for the free trial throughout October, but if library administrators decide to subscribe to the Mango Languages program, access will depend in future on the user’s holding an RCC/Richmond County Public Library card. However, says Ream, “We issue cards to anyone from the area who comes to the library with a photo ID and asks for one.”