Rev. Dr. Christopher Agnew

RCC-RILL looks at Anglican history

Dr. Christopher Agnew

Rev. Dr. Christopher M. Agnew will examine “The Anglican Church in Eighteenth Century Virginia, 1690-1776” during a Rappahannock Institute of Lifelong Learning course. It will take place on March 9, 23, and 30 in King George.

The L.E. Smoot Memorial Library in King George will be the venue for an examination of “The Anglican Church in Eighteenth Century Virginia, 1690-1776” by the Rev. Dr. Christopher M. Agnew. This course from the Rappahannock Community College Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL) will take place on March 9, 23, and 30 from 1 to 3 p.m.

Dr. Agnew will survey the role of religion in 18th-century Virginia, centering on John K. Nelson’s work: “A Blessed Company: Parishes, Parsons, and Parishioners in Anglican Virginia, 1690-1776.” Among the topics he will consider are the nature of the church at the beginning of the 18th century, Anglican spirituality in the 18th century, the impact of the Great Awakening, and the state of the established church on the eve of the Revolution. Other Christian traditions will also be noted.

Dr. Agnew completed a Ph.D. in history in 1979. In addition to teaching history at both secondary and collegiate levels, he has held the positions of manuscript librarian of the Historical Society of Delaware, registrar and archivist of the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware, and board member for the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church. He is the immediate past president of the National Episcopal Historians and Archivists, and now serves at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Nomini Grove, Westmoreland County.

Advance registration, with a tuition payment of $35, is required to take this course. For more information on “The Anglican Church in Eighteenth Century Virginia, 1690-1776” and other RILL courses, or to register, please call Sharon Drotleff at RCC’s Educational Foundation office (804-333-6707), or e-mail her at sdrotleff@rappahannock.edu.

The Educational Foundation expresses sincere appreciation to the Bank of Lancaster’s Golden Advantage program, and to Rappahannock Westminster-Canterbury, for their generous support of RILL in 2017.

RCC ponders King’s dream on MLK Day

Tyrone Fuller gave an animated talk on Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech at RCC on January 16.

Tyrone Fuller gave an animated talk on Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech at RCC on January 16.

“Have we achieved the dream?” asked Tyrone Fuller, Jr., in his Martin Luther King Day presentation at Rappahannock Community College on January 16. Most of the audience answered, “No,” saying that although progress has been made, there is still much to be done. Achieving the dream is an ongoing process, they said.

In reply Fuller pointed out, “The purpose of a dream is to give someone hope.” Since making the speech was part of King’s campaign to gain access to economic equality and freedom, from that historical perspective the dream has been fulfilled. We all, Fuller said, must be a part of that dream in order to help each person become the solution to the challenges we continue to face.

Fuller discussed several issues with the audience, including the reasons for segregation, how King’s speech changed people’s perceptions, and how each of us have helped to keep the dream alive. He said that King’s ideas about segregation, aggravation, and determination must all be addressed to ensure equal treatment for all people. And he agreed with King that the change had to be achieved peacefully.

“We move forward,” said Fuller, “not by amplifying the negative, but by reinforcing the positive.” As in driving a car, he said, one should focus on what can be seen through the windshield, not in the rear-view mirror. His concluding thought was, “Always strive to be a better person than you were the day before.”

The recipient of two Bronze Stars for valor, Fuller has over 35 years of experience in various leadership roles in the field of military human resources and logistical operations, culminating in his present position as director of military personnel human resource at Joint Base Langley-Eustis.