RCC-RILL studies India’s archaeology

Peter Bennett will teach “An Archaeological View of the History of India” for the Rappahannock Community College Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL).

Peter Bennett will teach “An Archaeological View of the History of India” for the Rappahannock Community College Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL).

Popular instructor Peter Bennett is scheduled to introduce a new topic—“An Archaeological View of the History of India”—for the Rappahannock Community College Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL). The course will be held on March 7, 14, and 21 (Tuesdays), from 1 to 3 p.m., in the auditorium at Rappahannock Westminster-Canterbury’s Irvington facility.

Bennett will look at three periods of India’s history: the early Indus River Valley Culture (c.3000-1200 B.C.); the development of “Traditional India” (c. 500 B.C.-1500 A.D.); and the earlier years of “Modern India” (c.1860-1947). Buildings representing each era—including the Taj Mahal—will be examined.

During decades of travel and research, Peter Bennett has made eight extended visits to India, and for eleven years he was chief lecturer for Air India’s program, “Know India.” Since his 1995 retirement, Bennett has led seminars in Williamsburg and the Northern Neck on many aspects of Indian society.

Advance registration, with a tuition payment of $35, is required to take this course. For more information on “An Archaeological View of the History of India” and other RILL courses, or to register, please call Sharon Drotleff at RCC’s Educational Foundation office (804-333-6707), or e-mail her at sdrotleff@rappahannock.edu.

The Educational Foundation expresses sincere appreciation to the Bank of Lancaster’s Golden Advantage program, and to Rappahannock Westminster-Canterbury, for their generous support of RILL in 2017.

Civil War battle is RCC-RILL topic

Jon Stallard will teach “The Battle of Chancellorsville” for the RCC Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL).

Jon Stallard will teach “The Battle of Chancellorsville” for the RCC Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL).

“The Battle of Chancellorsville” is the latest of several popular courses on the Civil War sponsored by the Rappahannock Community College Educational Foundation’s Rappahannock Institute for Lifelong Learning (RILL). Instructor Jon Stallard will lead the three sessions on March 3, 10, and 17 (Fridays), from 1 to 3 p.m., in Room 118 at RCC’s Warsaw Campus.

Following his stunning victory against Burnside in December 1862, Robert E. Lee faced a larger and better-equipped army across the Rappahannock. The class will join the action after the Battle of Fredericksburg, and will follow the renewed Federal offensive in the spring of 1863. The ensuing Battle of Chancellorsville—“Lee’s Perfect Battle”—is still studied in war colleges around the world.

Jon Stallard is a native of Richmond, Virginia, who holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in political science, history, and education from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is an author, lecturer, and genealogist, as well as a co-owner of Tappahannock’s WRAR Radio and co-host of its morning show.

Advance registration, with a tuition payment of $35, is required to take this course. For more information on “The Battle of Chancellorsville” and other RILL courses, or to register, please call Sharon Drotleff at RCC’s Educational Foundation office (804-333-6707), or e-mail her at sdrotleff@rappahannock.edu.

The Educational Foundation expresses sincere appreciation to the Bank of Lancaster’s Golden Advantage program, and to Rappahannock Westminster-Canterbury, for their generous support of RILL in 2017.

Tappahannock Rotary funds RCC scholarships

A 1970s photo of Cacky Taylor and Dr. John Gregory of the Tappahannock Rotary Club; they have been honored with scholarships established in their memory that will benefit qualifying RCC students.

A 1970s photo of Cacky Taylor and Dr. John Gregory of the Tappahannock Rotary Club; they have been honored with scholarships established in their memory that will benefit qualifying RCC students.

The Tappahannock Rotary Club is commemorating two of its long-time members, Cacky Taylor and Dr. John Gregory, both of whom died this past year, by providing two $1,000 scholarships for the benefit of qualifying Rappahannock Community College students. “Cacky and John strongly believed in the importance of education, and the need to support young people from Essex County who pursue higher education,” says Tappahannock Rotary Club president Joe Wolfinger. The RCC Educational Foundation, Inc. (RCC EFI) is administering the scholarships. The requirements, says Foundation director Sarah Pope, are Essex County residence, and at least a 2.0 grade-point average.

“The RCC Educational Foundation is so pleased to administer these scholarships that will assist Essex County students in receiving an RCC education,” says Pope. “The Tappahannock Rotary Club has given over $26,000 in RCC scholarships to Essex County students since 1992.”

“Our club is pleased to fund scholarships to honor the memory of two of our beloved, dedicated Rotarians,” affirms Wolfinger. Both were Rotarians for over 40 years, and each of them served two terms as president of Tappahannock Rotary.

Individuals or organizations who would like to set up a scholarship fund through RCC EFI should call Pope at 804-333-6705, e-mail her at spope@rappahannock.edu, or visit the Foundation page at RCC’s web site: www.rappahannock.edu/foundation. Students hoping to receive a scholarship can go to the same page to find an online application, or they can ask for information at the college’s main campuses in Glenns and Warsaw, or at the off-campus sites in Kilmarnock, King George, and New Kent. The application deadline for scholarships covering the academic year of 2017-18 is 11:59 p.m., Friday, February 17.

Application deadline for RCC scholarships

Multiple scholarship opportunities give RCC students something to smile about. Left to right: Davon Hamilton, Westmoreland County; Canvas Foxwell, Essex County; Dominique Liles, Westmoreland County; and assistant professor Kelly Cutchin of RCC’s English faculty.

Multiple scholarship opportunities give RCC students something to smile about. Left to right: Davon Hamilton, Westmoreland County; Canvas Foxwell, Essex County; Dominique Liles, Westmoreland County; and assistant professor Kelly Cutchin of RCC’s English faculty.

For those wishing to enroll at Rappahannock Community College for the academic year of 2017-18, the period during which they can apply for scholarships is quickly coming to an end, with a submission deadline of 11:59 p.m., Friday, February 17. The scholarship application—now set up as a completely electronic process—is available online to current or prospective students from a link at RCC’s website; on the front page, click on “Scholarships” from the drop-down menu under “Foundation.”

Well over $400,000 in scholarships, offered under a completely separate process from federal and state financial aid, are available for the upcoming year. Filling out the application just once puts students under consideration for all of them, and due to a new and more efficient review process, scholarship recipients will be notified of their awards by mid-April.

“The college’s goal,” says RCC president Dr. Elizabeth Crowther, “is to make it possible for any student with the ability and desire to learn to attend and receive a degree from RCC. A growing base of available scholarships coupled with federal and state financial assistance programs will make that dream a reality.”

To learn more, please call the Welcome Desk on either campus (804-758-6730 at Glenns, or 804-333-6730 at Warsaw), or visit the college website at rappahannock.edu.

RCC’s tech department gains faculty member, Lisa Carrington

RCC’s tech department gains faculty member, Lisa Carrington

Lisa Carrington is RCC’s newest information technology instructor.

Lisa Carrington is RCC’s newest information technology instructor.

“I hope to continue to educate students and assist in helping them find careers that they will love,” says Lisa Carrington, Rappahannock Community College’s newest information technology faculty member. “In my efforts, I hope to inspire and promote a sense of self-value that will ensure their futures are as positive as possible.”

Carrington holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science and two master’s degrees, one in computer science, and the other in education. “I have been in higher education for most of my career,” she says.

“During this time span, I have served in many information technology positions.” She states that she has worked in the private sector as IT personnel, calling upon various skills within the technology field, and has also worked extensively in the field of project management, particularly with the SharePoint program.

At RCC Carrington teaches “Introduction to Information Systems,” “Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts,” and “Information Literacy.”

“In these courses,” she says, “I hope the students are able to better understand the concepts and implementations performed within the course. I also hope that the students are able to fluently understand and identify information technology terms and strategies that they learned or are introduced to throughout the course.” She claims as her most significant accomplishment, “teaching students and watching them grow and move forward based on the knowledge that they gain from me.”

“Lisa’s enthusiasm for teaching and her student-centered approach to instruction are contagious,” said RCC’s interim vice president of instruction and student development, Dr. Marty Brooks, in her e-mail introducing Carrington to the RCC community.

Carrington was born in Norfolk and grew up in nearby Chesapeake. She plans in the future to obtain her doctoral degree in higher education, “but right now I am just loving the position I am in.” In her spare time, “I love to coupon as well as reading books. I also like to eat different foods, and visit different places of interest around the state. I would like to travel the world and see all the beauty different areas have to offer.”

Dr. Carl Hershner of the Virginia Institute for Marine Science

Watershed expert speaks at RCC

Dr. Carl Hershner of the Virginia Institute for Marine Science

Dr. Carl Hershner of the Virginia Institute for Marine Science spoke at RCC about his research on water quality, wetlands ecology, and watershed resource management.

On November 30, Dr. Carl Hershner, director of coastal resource management with the Virginia Institute for Marine Science, spoke at Rappahannock Community College about his research on water quality, wetlands ecology, and watershed resource management.

“Healthy state and local economies and a healthy Chesapeake Bay are integrally related; balanced economic development and water quality protection are not mutually exclusive,” says the Chesapeake Bay Preservation Act. The Act deals comprehensively with the relationships between water quality and land use planning and development, and assists local governments with land use planning needs in order to meet water quality goals through the development of land use regulations, ordinances and comprehensive plans.

Dr. Hershner explained how the Commonwealth of Virginia manages the resource management areas (RMAs) created by the Act through the state’s Department of Environmental Quality, and the individual counties manage their assigned RMAs through local laws and regulations.

A question period at the end of Dr. Hershner’s talk allowed attending faculty, staff, students, and the public to gain greater insight about these issues. Dr. Tom Mosca, chair of RCC’s Environmental Sustainability Committee and sponsor of its Math and Science Club, coordinated the event.

Ethan Harrison and Sarah Wagner are the winners of RCC Student Research Paper Awards for Fall 2016.

Research papers earn awards for two RCC students

RCC Students Ethan Harrison and Sarah Wagner, Professor Timothy Knappenberger.

Left: Ethan Harrison of West Point earned first prize in RCC’s Student Research Paper competition for Fall 2016. Right: Sarah Wagner of King George County earned second prize in RCC’s Student Research Paper competition for Fall 2016. At right is Professor Timothy Knappenberger, for whose class Wagner wrote the paper.

Rappahannock Community College’s library coordinator, Dan Ream, is pleased to announce the winners of the college’s Student Research Paper Awards for Fall 2016.

The purpose of this competition is to recognize excellent writing and research in student papers counting toward RCC credit courses during the Fall 2016 semester. All entries were carefully reviewed by a panel of three judges: Ream; RCC’s president, Dr. Elizabeth Crowther; and the dean of college advancement, Sarah Pope.

Out of 23 papers submitted for consideration, the first prize went to “Modeling Syrian Internally Displaced Person Movements: A Case Study of Conflict, Travel Accessibility, and Resource Availability,” by Ethan Harrison of West Point. This paper was written for Professor Matt Brent as an independent study project. In addition to Harrison’s $200 award, Professor Brent will receive a $50 honorarium.

Sarah Wagner of King George County earned second prize for “A Consideration of Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States,” which she wrote for Professor Timothy Knappenberger’s Physical Geology class at RCC. Wagner’s award will be $100, and Professor Knappenberger will receive a $50 honorarium. Both papers are posted at the RCC Library page on the college website.

All submissions were judged according to the quality of library and Internet sources cited (including journal articles, books, or web resources), as well as the overall quality of writing and presentation. The cash awards were funded through the RCC Educational Foundation, Inc. This competition was organized for the first time in Spring 2015, and has continued each Fall and Spring semester since then.