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Tobacco, Alcohol, and Controlled Substances

Smoking and Use of Other Tobacco Products
Smoking and the use of other tobacco products is permitted only at outside designated areas. Smoking and use of other tobacco products is not permitted in or next to the college buildings or in college-owned vehicles.

Alcohol and Illicit Drugs
RCC seeks to provide a safe and stable environment for its students. As a part of that effort, the College fully complies with all state and federal statutes relating to substance and alcohol use and abuse. The College is designated a drug-free zone and provides educational programs about the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol.

Standards of Conduct
RCC students will not possess, sell, use, give away or otherwise distribute illegal drugs or alcoholic beverages when on-campus, in-class, or participating in any College-related activity or function.

The College will cooperate with law enforcement authorities to enforce statutes regarding drugs and alcoholic beverages. The possession, use, manufacture, and distribution of illegal drugs or other controlled substances by individuals at RCC will not be tolerated. Violation of these statutes and school policies may result in criminal penalties and disciplinary action by the College. The procedures for disciplinary action are described below. (See Student Disciplinary Procedure.)

Health Risks
Students should be aware that drug and alcohol abuse may cause a number of health problems, create problems in relationships with others, and make learning more difficult.

These substances alter the normal processes of the body and impair mental and physical functions as well as judgment. Long-term abuse can lead to physical and/or mental dependence and death.

Education and Prevention
The faculty and staff of RCC will make every effort to ensure that students recognize the impact that drug and alcohol abuse can have on one’s ability to succeed academically and professionally. The College may periodically offer courses that address issues related to prevention of substance abuse. The library maintains a collection of materials on substance abuse that is available to the student body and to the community. The College sponsors annual programs or lectures on substance abuse issues for the student body.

Counseling, Treatment Services, and Referral
Student Development will provide assessment and referral to appropriate community agencies for students who think they are at risk of drug or alcohol abuse. Students are assured that issues and concerns may be discussed openly and without fear of reprisal to the extent permissible by law.

Guidelines for Serving Alcoholic Beverages
The College does not serve alcoholic beverages at any College-sponsored student function, whether the function is an on-campus or an off-campus event.

College Disciplinary Sanctions
Most students will conform to the standards of conduct relating to the use of alcohol and controlled or illicit drugs. Occasionally, however, a student may violate those standards while on campus and/or participating in a College-related activity. Violations of these standards may result in disciplinary actions against the student. (See Student Disciplinary Procedure).

State and Federal Sanctions
Disciplinary action by the College does not preclude additional sanctions by local, state, and federal authorities. For violation of state or federal drug and alcohol laws, the College will call in these authorities to conduct further investigation and prosecution.

Individuals found guilty of violations of statutes involving illicit drugs and alcohol are subject to extensive penalties at both state and federal levels. Generally, penalties for violations involving alcohol are addressed in state laws while penalties for violations involving drugs are addressed in both state and federal laws.

Virginia’s Alcohol Beverage Control Act contains a variety of laws governing the possession, use, and consumption of alcoholic beverages. The Commonwealth prohibits any person under the age of 21 to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage, and makes it unlawful to sell to or buy for a minor any alcoholic beverage. It is also unlawful to consume alcoholic beverages in unlicensed public places. Punishments for any of these infractions may include confinement for up to twelve months, fines of $2,500 and a driver’s license suspension of 1 year.

Federal penalties normally imposed for trafficking illicit drugs range up to life imprisonment and a $20 million fine. State laws against illicit drugs and controlled substances levy fines of up to $100,000 and life imprisonment for a second conviction of intent to sell or otherwise distribute certain Schedule I or II controlled substances.

Virginia Laws – Alcohol
Virginia’s Alcohol Beverage Control Act contains a variety of laws governing the possession, use, and consumption of alcoholic beverages. The Act applies to the students and employees of this institution. As required by the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, the pertinent laws, including sanctions for their violation, are summarized below.

It is unlawful for any person under age 21 to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage. Violation of the law exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is either confinement in jail for up to twelve months or a fine up to $2,500, or both. Additionally, such person’s Virginia driver’s license may be suspended for a period of not more than one year.

It is unlawful for any person to sell alcoholic beverages to persons under the age of 21 years of age. Violation of the law exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is confinement in jail for up to twelve months and a fine up to $2,500, either or both.

It is unlawful for any person to purchase alcoholic beverages for another when, at the time of the purchase, he knows or has reason to know that the person for whom the alcohol is purchased is under the legal drinking age.

It is unlawful for any person to consume alcoholic beverages in unlicensed public places. Violation of the law, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is a fine of up to $250.

Controlled Substances and Illicit Drugs
The unlawful possession, distribution, and use of controlled substances and illicit drugs, as defined by the Virginia Drug Control Act, are prohibited in Virginia. Controlled substances are classified under the Act into “schedules,” ranging from Schedule I through Schedule VI, as defined in sections 54.1-3446 through 54.1-3456 of the Code of Virginia (1950), as amended. As required by the Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, the pertinent laws, including sanctions for their violation, are summarized below.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedules I or II of the Drug Control Act, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a felony conviction for which the punishment is a term of imprisonment ranging from one year to ten years, or in the discretion of the jury or the court trying the case without a jury, either confinement in jail for up to twelve months or a fine up to $2,500, or both.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule III of the Drug Control Act, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is either confinement in jail for up to twelve months or a fine of up to $2,500, or both.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule IV of the Drug Control Act, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is either confinement in jail for up to six months or a fine of up to $1,000, or both.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule V of the Drug Control Act, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is a fine of up to $500.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule VI of the Drug Control Act, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is a fine of up to $250.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedule I or II of the Drug Control Act, with the intent to sell or otherwise distribute, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a felony conviction for which the punishment is imprisonment from five to forty years and a fine of up to $100,000. Upon a second conviction, the violator must be imprisoned for not less than five years but may suffer life imprisonment, and may be fined up to $100,000.

Possession of a controlled substance classified in Schedules III, IV, or V of the Drug Control Act, with the intent to sell or otherwise distribute, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is either confinement in jail for up to one year or a fine of up to $2,500, or both.

Possession of marijuana, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is either confinement in jail for up to thirty days or a fine of up to $500, or both. Upon a second conviction, punishment is either confinement in jail for up to one year or a fine of up to $2,500, or both.

Possession of less than one-half ounce of marijuana, with intent to sell or otherwise distribute, upon conviction, exposes the violator to a misdemeanor conviction for which the punishment is either confinement in jail for up to one year or a fine of up to $2,500, or both. If the amount of marijuana involved is more than one-half ounce to five pounds, the crime is a felony with a sanction of imprisonment from one to ten years, or in the discretion of the jury or the court trying the case without a jury, either confinement in jail for up to one year or a fine of up to $2,500, or both. If the amount of marijuana involved is more than five pounds, the crime is a felony with a sanction of imprisonment from five to thirty years.

This page was last modified on June 11, 2014. If you are looking for previous catalog information, please reference the 2008-2010 Catalog, 2010-2012 Catalog, or 2013-2014 Catalog.


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